Deep Dives

Biden administration urges automakers to disregard 'Right to Repair' law

June 14, 2023
We summarized this source into key points to remember. To know more about it, please click on the link above.

Receive a daily summary of what happened in tech, powered by ML and AI.

Thank you! We sent you a verification email.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Join 1,500+ thinkers, builders and investors.
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has advised automakers not to comply with Massachusetts' "right to repair" law, citing serious safety concerns. The law mandates manufacturers to install an open data platform for connected cars, which the NHTSA argues could be exploited to manipulate vehicle systems, including critical functions like steering, acceleration, and braking.

Massachusetts' "Right to Repair" Law: In 2020, Massachusetts voters expanded the state's "right to repair" law to include telematics and connected car services.
  • The updated law mandates manufacturers to equip vehicles with a standardized open data platform.
  • This platform should enable vehicle owners and independent repair facilities to access mechanical data and run diagnostics via a mobile application.

  • Security Concerns: The NHTSA argues that the lack of proper security controls in the law could pose significant safety risks.
  • The "open access" could allow malevolent actors to remotely connect to and control vehicles, potentially endangering lives.
  • The agency cites concerns such as unauthorized individuals potentially being able to manipulate crucial vehicle functions like steering, acceleration, or braking.

  • NHTSA's Recommendation: The NHTSA advises automakers not to comply with the Massachusetts law due to these security and safety issues.
  • It suggests that federal law, which prioritizes safety, should preempt the state law in this instance.

  • Potential Automaker Response: Automakers could respond by disabling telematics and connected services in vehicles sold in Massachusetts.
  • Subaru has already taken this step for its model year 2022 vehicles, and other manufacturers may follow suit.

  • The REPAIR Act: A bipartisan "right to repair" law, called the REPAIR Act, is currently making its way through Congress.
  • The bill acknowledges the cybersecurity risks and, if passed, would require the NHTSA to develop data access standards for connected vehicles.

  • Did you like this article? 🙌

    Receive a daily summary of the best tech news from 50+ media (The Verge, Tech Crunch...).
    Thank you! We sent you a verification email.
    Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
    Join 1,500+ thinkers, builders and investors.
    You're in! Thanks for subscribing to Techpresso :)
    Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
    Join 5,000+ thinkers, builders and investors.
    Also available on:

    You might also like